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A Call For Help

        By Makou Lin

        They tell us only to run and hide. For they are armed, and you are not. You must wait in fear until someone comes and saves you. But that’s not TRUE! No situation is certain, and no future is clear. What seems like uncertainty, can be turn to courage. Courage to stand your ground, even in the face of death, can saves lives.
As an LSSC student, every new day is always filled with uncertainty. With dozens of daily visitors, students must know how to react when there is unusual activity on campus. That’s why LSSC has teamed up with ALICE Training Institute, giving the students the opportunity to attend an on-campus ALICE Training: Active Shooter Response Training Workshop. The training workshop will focus on providing students with proper emergency techniques and safety measures against intruders. Instructors will be guiding students through 4 stimulation-based drills, including: run and hide techniques, lockdown, barricading, and countering. Stimulation drills will partake in a classroom, aided with toy gun armed intruders, mimicking an intense intrusion. Students will learn and apply proper techniques in response to intruders, including but not limited to: calling 911, blocking entry, last resort counter method, and proper evacuation. Please be advised that the workshop’s realistic stimulations can be a trigger for people who suffer from PTSD. But students who wish to attend, but not partake in the stimulations, can safely do so in the safe zones provided.
With mandatory registrations, students can sign up for the event days following the e-mail sent out on their lake hawk mail, titled “Spring 2018 - Active Shooter Response Training Workshops”. With any questions or concerns, contact Linda Karp at KarpL@lssc.edu. Please note, the next ALICE training workshop is on March 28, 2018 at the South Lake Campus, building 2, room 101. No LSSC students should be left unprepared and left behind, take action today and ALICE trained.

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